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On “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” by Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede

On “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” by Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede

In “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede consider open access repositories in the context of social justice. This is not, perhaps, what it might seem at first glance: Heller and Gaede move beyond the standard argument that open access is a public good, and de facto social issue (although they do use this argument as a theoretical foundation). Rather, Heller and Gaede run an experiment to determine the…

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On “North American Campus-Based Open Access Funds: A Five-Year Progress Report,” by Greg Tananbaum

On “North American Campus-Based Open Access Funds: A Five-Year Progress Report,” by Greg Tananbaum

In “North American Campus-Based Open Access Funds: A Five-Year Progress Report,” Greg Tananbaum reviews and provides a status update on the SPARC Campus-based Open Access Funds initiative. This initiative provides seed funding to libraries that authors can access as need be in order to publish open access. Tananbaum provides impressive statistics on the relative uptake of the initiative, including papers (3863) and unique authors (3121) funded to date. But he also outlines challenges that have arisen: namely, enticing and sustaining…

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On “Will Open Access Change the Game?” by Sven Fund

On “Will Open Access Change the Game?” by Sven Fund

In “Will Open Access Change the Game?: Hypotheses on the Future Cooperation of Libraries, Researchers, and Publishers,” Sven Fund considers open access publishing as analogous to the disruptive technologies that have become trademarks of digital technology. He argues that open access will “most likely lead to wanted and unwanted developments and consequences for different actors” (206). Fund rightly suggests that the long term impacts of open access have not been sufficiently considered; he does not, however, answer such a need…

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On “Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values,” by Dan Cohen

On “Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values,” by Dan Cohen

In the blog post “Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values,” Dan Cohen identifies four emotions or values (impartiality, passion, shame, and narcissism), and relates them to the current scholarly communication system that often prioritizes toll-access publishing over open access options. His post is aimed at changing scholars’ minds, in particular. Cohen suggests that impartiality should reign over venue choice; that is, if scholarship is of good quality that should raise it in status rather than whether or not it was…

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On “Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future,” by Martin Paul Eve

On “Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future,” by Martin Paul Eve

In this thorough volume, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future, Martin Paul Eve introduces readers to open access as a concept and practice. Where Eve’s study differs from other major open access books, like Peter Suber’s Open Access, is in his specific focus on the humanities. Open access is often discussed in relation to the sciences only. This is for a few reasons, including that the earliest, largest-scale open access publishing movement started in physics; open…

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On “Editing as a Theoretical Pursuit” by Jerome McGann

On “Editing as a Theoretical Pursuit” by Jerome McGann

In the chapter “Editing as a Theoretical Pursuit” from Radiant Textuality, Jerome McGann considers how scholarly editing can be a theory-based activity rather than a straightforward attempt to provide a faithful version of a particular text (the dreaded “factive obligations” [81]). He argues that electronic textual editing can be especially fruitful for theoretical editing, because it can blend the procedures of documentary and critical editing. To demonstrate his argument, McGann uses the creation of The Rosetti Archive as an example. He…

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On “The Productive Unease of 21st-century Digital Scholarship,” by Julia Flanders

On “The Productive Unease of 21st-century Digital Scholarship,” by Julia Flanders

In the classic 2009 digital humanities (DH) article “The Productive Unease of 21st-century Digital Scholarship” Julia Flanders explores the unique position of DH vis-a-vis the larger narrative of the inherent progress of technological development. She suggests that although DH is innately tied to changes in technology, it doesn’t “progress” in the say way (or else isn’t as driven by the concept of progress as industry might be) — rather, it creates a productive unease. Flanders points out three examples of productive…

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On “In Defense of Open Access: Or, Why I Stopped Worrying and Started an OA Journal,” by Megan Lowe

On “In Defense of Open Access: Or, Why I Stopped Worrying and Started an OA Journal,” by Megan Lowe

In the article “In Defense of Open Access: Or, Why I Stopped Worrying and Started an OA Journal,” Megan Lowe describes Codex, an open access (OA) journal that she edits. Lowe frames the Codex summary within a larger framework of the critique of OA publishing as not being rigorous enough (especially in a 2013 study done by John Bohannon where he criticizes peer review in OA publications). By contrast, Lowe argues that peer review issues are not endemic only to…

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On “Publications,” by Steven E. Jones

On “Publications,” by Steven E. Jones

A chapter on publications in Steven E. Jones’s 2014 book The Emergence of the Digital Humanities” might seem out of place at first. (As in, “Hey, this is a DH book, why are we talking about scholarly communication?!”) But Jones is quick to point out the close ties between the digital humanities and publishing, which he frames under the conception of publishing as a means of the academy’s own production. Digital humanists, Jones argues, “are in a good position to…

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On “Network Realism: William Gibson and New Forms of Fiction,” by James Bridle

On “Network Realism: William Gibson and New Forms of Fiction,” by James Bridle

In the blogpost “Network Realism: William Gibson and New Forms of Fiction,” James Bridle offers his thoughts on William Gibson’s novel Zero History, and posits the book as an example of what he calls “Network Realism.” Network Realism, according to Bridle, is “writing that is of and about the network” (n.p.). According to Bridle, Gibson’s novel fits the bill because it is timely, realistic, and media-saturated. He situates the novel in the media stream of Google and Twitter, and claims…

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