Little Reviews

On “Towards Best Practices in Collaborative Online Knowledge Production,” by Susan Brown

On “Towards Best Practices in Collaborative Online Knowledge Production,” by Susan Brown

In “Towards Best Practices in Collaborative Online Knowledge Production,” Susan Brown illuminates the affordances of web technologies and standards for contemporary, large-scale and multiplayer scholarly production, possible in part because of the Web 2.0 evolution. In this chapter she draws explicitly from her experience leading The Orlando Project and the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory. Brown suggests that in order to create truly “superior scholarship,” (48) we must design collaborative practices with data management, preservation, standardization, efficacy, and community engagement in…

Read More Read More

On “A Case Study of Scholars’ Open and Sharing Practices,” by George Veletsianos

On “A Case Study of Scholars’ Open and Sharing Practices,” by George Veletsianos

In “A Case Study of Scholars’ Open and Sharing Practices,” George Veletsianos examines faculty openness and sharing practices at a university that does not have any sort of open access or open scholarship policy. He concludes, unsurprisingly, that although many faculty members happen to be sharing their work and resources with others, these practices are limited without the incentive of an institutional policy. Notably, Veletsianos draws on David Wiley’s differentiation between openness and sharing: “open practices have to do with…

Read More Read More

On “Open Science: A Revolution in Sight?” by Bernard Rentier

On “Open Science: A Revolution in Sight?” by Bernard Rentier

In “Open Science: A Revolution in Sight?,” Bernard Rentier provides an overview of the Open Access (OA) movement. He acknowledges the affordances of the digital realm and points out where the academy is still holding fast to traditional practices like closed peer review and prestige-based publishing, even in the face of better options. Rentier also discusses the OA policy at his institution, the Université de Liège, which requires all faculty to deposit publications in their institutional repository. Decisions regarding promotion,…

Read More Read More

On Selections from “Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science,” edited by Rajiv S. Jhangiani and Robert Biswas-Diener

On Selections from “Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science,” edited by Rajiv S. Jhangiani and Robert Biswas-Diener

Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science draws together research and writing on Open Education. Primarily, the chapters reflect on Open Education initiatives, including the creation and use of Open Educational Resources (OER). Below, I quickly summarize a handful of chapters that are relevant to my current research into open social scholarship. “Iterating Toward Openness: Lessons Learned on a Personal Journey,” by David Wiley In “Iterating Toward Openness: Lessons Learned on a Personal Journey,” David Wiley discusses…

Read More Read More

On “Networked Participatory Scholarship: Emergent Techno-Cultural Pressures Toward Open and Digital Scholarship in Online Networks,” by George Veletsianos and Royce Kimmons

On “Networked Participatory Scholarship: Emergent Techno-Cultural Pressures Toward Open and Digital Scholarship in Online Networks,” by George Veletsianos and Royce Kimmons

In “Networked Participatory Scholarship: Emergent Techno-Cultural Pressures Toward Open and Digital Scholarship in Online Networks,” George Veletsianos and Royce Kimmons explore the possibly causal, possibly correlated relationship between contemporary scholarly practice and technology. In particular, they focus on the emergence of specific scholarly practices that are situated in online social practices. Veletsianos and Kimmons nominate such scholarly activity as “Networked Participatory Scholarship.” “Networked Participatory Scholarship,” the authors write, “is the emergent practice of scholars’ use of participatory technologies and online…

Read More Read More

On “Developing an Open, Networked Peer Review System,” by Nina Belojevic

On “Developing an Open, Networked Peer Review System,” by Nina Belojevic

In “Developing an Open, Networked Peer Review System” Nina Belojevic seeks successful methods to combine the scholarly and the practical in digital projects. Digital scholarship is increasingly legitimate in the academy, especially in the realms of digital humanities and new media. But digital project development, Belojevic argues, could benefit from certain game- and other creative-industry project management and design practices. To demonstrate her argument, Belojevic provides the Personas for Open Peer Review project as an example. In developing the Personas…

Read More Read More

On “Exploding, Centralizing, and Reimagining: Critical Scholarship Refracted Through the NewRadial Prototype,” by Jon Saklofske

On “Exploding, Centralizing, and Reimagining: Critical Scholarship Refracted Through the NewRadial Prototype,” by Jon Saklofske

In “Exploding, Centralizing, and Reimagining: Critical Scholarship Refracted Through the NewRadial Prototype,” Jon Saklofske discusses NewRadial, an Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) prototype. In Saklofske’s own words, “NewRadial is a data visualization environment that was originally designed as an alternative way to encounter and annotate image-based databases” (n.p). Here, he situates NewRadial within the larger context of INKE’s focus (at the time) on alternative models for journals and monographs. Saklofske argues for the value of multimodal, non-linear interaction with cultural…

Read More Read More

On “Building Expertise to Support Digital Scholarship: A Global Perspective,” by Vivian Lewis, Lisa Shapiro, Xuemao Wang, and Jon E. Cawthorne

On “Building Expertise to Support Digital Scholarship: A Global Perspective,” by Vivian Lewis, Lisa Shapiro, Xuemao Wang, and Jon E. Cawthorne

“Building Expertise to Support Digital Scholarship: A Global Perspective” is a Council for Library and Information Resources (CLIR) report compiled by  Vivian Lewis, Lisa Spiro, Xuemao Wang, and Jon E. Cawthorne. The authors comment on the rise of digital scholarship centres internationally, but the lack of research regarding best practices for running such a centre. Lewis et al. stress the importance of gathering information about digital scholarship expertise, institutional structures, and requisite competencies. To remedy the want of pragmatic information…

Read More Read More

On “Dissemination as Cultivation: Scholarly Communications in a Digital Age,” by James O’Sullivan, Christopher P. Long, and Mark A. Mattson

On “Dissemination as Cultivation: Scholarly Communications in a Digital Age,” by James O’Sullivan, Christopher P. Long, and Mark A. Mattson

In “Dissemination as Cultivation: Scholarly Communications in a Digital Age,” James O’Sullivan, Christopher P. Long, and Mark A. Mattson link form to content in the context of publishing. That is, they argue that the digital realm allows for scholarly content to be presented in more representative forms than print publication can offer. Although this may not ring true for all fields, it can for the digital humanities, which is often characterized by its openness and collegiality (as Elika Ortéga and…

Read More Read More

On “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” by Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede

On “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” by Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede

In “Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access,” Margaret Heller and Franny Gaede consider open access repositories in the context of social justice. This is not, perhaps, what it might seem at first glance: Heller and Gaede move beyond the standard argument that open access is a public good, and de facto social issue (although they do use this argument as a theoretical foundation). Rather, Heller and Gaede run an experiment to determine the…

Read More Read More